Gruber
HobbyMasters
M.L. Toys
KidsWheels
Gruber
HobbyMasters
M.L. Toys
KidsWheels
HobbyMasters M.L. Toys
Gruber
KidsWheels
High-RPM motors
sub-note: take care of these motors, they are extreeeeeemly hard to find, so if you blow it up or let out the magic smoke fixing it aint gonna be easy. :-(
#44740
First mod. I picked up a F-150 and I am opting for a turbo button.

I have a lot of question and I wanted to run what I think I've learned by everyone to make sure I am right.
In need a bosch type relay with leads reading 30, 85, 86, 87, 87a.

For breaking i need a 5w 0.47 ohm resistor?

My wire should be 14 awg minimum?

Almost any "Normally Open" switch will work for the turbo button?

I need to add fuses as close to the batteries as I can. But what size, 30 amp? Can I go smaller to be safer?

Will the brake still work on a hill or will the resistor keep it from really braking?

I have a three working used red 6v batteries. Will they work or will their built in protection kick in when I don't want it to?

12v_Turbo.jpg
This I assume should be in-front of the foot throttle and Fwd/Rev switches.


Am I missing anything?
#44767
Divinar wrote:You've got it. This diagram will even work with the cheaper 12v relay. Although they make 6v versions ;-)
The diagram is showing 12v on the coil. No need for a 6v.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
coulter's wrote:I have a lot of question and I wanted to run what I think I've learned by everyone to make sure I am right.
In need a bosch type relay with leads reading 30, 85, 86, 87, 87a.
Yes, with a 30/40 amp contact rating.
For breaking i need a 5w 0.47 ohm resistor?
It is not needed, but makes the breaking softer and reduces gear box stress.

My wire should be 14 awg minimum?
I always recommend 12gauge as a minimum, but some toys come wired with 14 gauge and work fine.

Almost any "Normally Open" switch will work for the turbo button?
Yes, the relay coil draws very little current. The original designed called for a 'Normally Open Momentary Closed' push button switch mounted on the steering wheel. Mounting a ON/OFF toggle or rocker style switch to the dash would work as well, but it would work like a High/Low speed selector not a temporary 'turbo' boost.

I need to add fuses as close to the batteries as I can. But what size, 30 amp? Can I go smaller to be safer?
Yes, a 30 amp. With proper wire gauge using a 30 amp fuse is safe. Anything less will probably prematurely trip/blow.

Will the brake still work on a hill or will the resistor keep it from really braking?
a 5 watt 0.47 ohm resistor should 'hold' on moderate inclines.

I have a three working used red 6v batteries. Will they work or will their built in protection kick in when I don't want it to?
I never used them, but I read several threads were the internal breaker caused problems...I think it was mostly when using them on 18v setups. Most members use aftermarket 6v 12ah batteries. If you decide to use the stock batteries. Placing external fuses on them would just be redundant.

Your drawing looks good and accurate.
#45980
I was looking around and I found jparthum made this.

https://picasaweb.google.com/117313455280346131163/6VSingleBatteryWith6VBoostVia12VRelay#slideshow/5593754472934925810
I thought it was a good visual and would help others with similar questions.
#46001
I started thinking about how I would avoid one battery running down more than the other. Then I came up with the idea of constantly staying 12v, and then the turbo button will change the motors from series to parallel. I would think someone has done this before.

I got the idea from looking at this schematic that Jparthum posted.
Image


Does anyone have any thoughts?
Last edited by coulter's on Sat Dec 03, 2011 4:04 am, edited 2 times in total.
#46098
Just when I think I know how I will add this turbo I change my mind.

I liked my last plan but I started to read that some people get stuck a lot when the wheel motors are in series.
My kid will be on grass most of the time. And I came up with a new solution today.
I will use two relays and a momentary switch to switch the batteries from series to parallel.

I do have a problem though, is there a way i can have the relays powered by the two batteries in series, and at the same time have them switch the batteries to parallel? I might need a separate battery here.

Any ideas?
#46128
coulter's wrote:I do have a problem though, is there a way i can have the relays powered by the two batteries in series, and at the same time have them switch the batteries to parallel? I might need a separate battery here.

Any ideas?
You would need a separate battery or you could use 6v relays. The draw back to 6v relays...If your adding lights or any other 12v accessories, you would need a fixed 12v source to power those as well.

Switching the motors from series to parallel is how most of the manufactures of these toys wire there shifters to control the speed.
Most members that would like to add a high/low speed selector, just replace the original wiring harness with a 12v PW harness and shifter off a donor toy.
Last edited by 12vwiz on Sun Dec 04, 2011 1:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#46352
Yes. but he wrote this:
coulter's wrote:I started thinking about how I would avoid one battery running down more than the other.

If he is trying keep both batteries drawing an equal load. That would rule out voltage tapping.
#49850
wired wrote:What about bus bars with diodes for voltage tapping?

Sorry, if I'm not following your thoughts...

Tapping any voltage off a series configuration other than the total series voltage (diode isolated or not) will still cause an unequal charge state in the battery.

Now, If your talking about reducing the total voltage down to a lower level by using the reverse breakdown voltage of zener diodes, then yes, but it would only be good for low currents.
Last edited by 12vwiz on Sat Jan 07, 2012 10:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#63440
Electrical geniuses:

I'm going to go 12v on my son's Super 6 Lightning McQueen soon and want to use the button method with two 6v batteries. I've studied this diagram and pretty much have it, but am not sure about one thing:

Where I've circled in red, is the resistor wire tied into the wire from the battery or is that just where the two "lines" in the schematic overlap? And is that resistor already in the factory harness? (Oops...guess that's TWO things) :oops:
Attachments
intersect.PNG
intersect.PNG (62.26 KiB) Viewed 4727 times
#63492
h-bomb wrote:Where I've circled in red, is the resistor wire tied into the wire from the battery or is that just where the two "lines" in the schematic overlap? And is that resistor already in the factory harness? (Oops...guess that's TWO things) :oops:
It is a connection point. In the drawing... both the resistor and the turbo button require a negative source. This is where the author is showing the connection being made , but it could be made anywhere on the negative side. The larger line is the main negative wire from the batteries to the motors. He just taped the negative source their instead of running the wires back to the battery negative.

The brake shunt line could have a resistor installed or it could use a direct wire to the foot pedal instead, It all depends on the model you have. Some have it and some don't. The resistor just determines the pressure that the brakes applies. A direct wire being the max breaking and a resistor with a increasing value lowers the breaking pressure.

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